COVID-19

ACIA response to Covid situation

 

 

Even with the easing of lockdown, some of us will still continue to work from home.

So here are some useful resources to help you in the 'new normal'.

 

 

-Looking after yourself:

 

9 Tips To Be Productive When Working At Home During COVID-19: Forbes

Looking after your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak: mentalhealth.org


-Learning & Development:

Continuous learning is important in developing new skills and adjusting to change. Here are some opportunities to improve research and analytical skills:

 

Binary comparisons, year-to-date figures and policing.

A number of discussions have recently appeared on Twitter about this area. This has been a discussion point for a number of years. These free to access articles are a must read for crime and intelligence analysts:

 

Why you can't identify changes in crime by comparing this month to last month by Dr Matt Ashby https://the-sra.org.uk/SRA/Blog/whyyoucantidentifychangesincrimebycomparingthismonthtolastmonth.aspx

 

Year-to-date comparisons and why we should stop doing them by Prof Jerry Ratcliffe. https://www.jratcliffe.net/post/year-to-date-comparisons-and-why-we-should-stop-doing-them

Weak excuses for using binary comparisons by Insp Simon Guilfoyle https://inspguilfoyle.wordpress.com/2014/05/02/weak-excuses-for-using-binary-comparisons/

 

Ted talk: Visual perception

Visual perception and cognitive bias are two areas that analysts should be aware. Breaking these help analysts to continually question what they see, which ultimately improves their analysis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf5otGNbkuc

 

Beware spurious correlations!

This link is useful for those who are looking to improve their knowledge and regular use of statistics. These are simple and easy to follow and can help ‘nudge’ the willing analyst to get more from their data and graphs: https://www.tylervigen.com/spurious-correlations


 

-Virtual Training Opportunities:

Continuous learning is important in developing new skills and adjusting to change. Here are some opportunities to improve research and analytical skills:

 

Qwarie: OSINT – reduced price for ACIA members £350 +vat per/ user until the end of May

Qwarie has changed its training from the classroom to a full Distance Learning package, offering all of our training material as pdf’s, many with associated practical training tasks. The full details and list of all of the Distance Learning content can be located at https://www.uk-osint.net/distancelearning.html but including modules on;

  • Google & Advanced Searching Techniques

  • Other Search Engines & Meta Search Engines

  • Researching Digital Images Online

  • Understanding E-mails As An Investigative Resource

  • Social Media / Identifying People Through Their Social Media Activities / Creating & Managing False Personas / Instagram, Twitter / Facebook / Linked & Bayt / VK, OK and others

  • Databases Research

  • Researching Those Using Blogs, Forums & Gaming Sites

  • Researching Those Using Online Sales & Auction Sites

  • Other Online Investigative Resources & An Introduction To Accessing The Dark Web

ACAI members get it at the discounted rate of only £350 +vat per/ user until the end of May if they either come through you or email us at training@qwarie.com and letting us know they are ACIA members.

 

Coursera: Learning the basic of AWS cloud tech - Free

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/aws-fundamentals?utm_medium=email&utm_source=marketing&utm_campaign=WTwFoHuZEeqd_xFKDENJkw

 

Coursera: Python for everybody - Free!

https://www.coursera.org/specializations/python

 

Statistical Analysis with R for Public Health Specialization

A useful free course in R. R is fast becoming the stats analysis package of choice for many academic researchers. It is also growing in law enforcement. Whilst this FREE course is aimed at public health, the learning can be transferred to other arenas. https://www.coursera.org/specializations/statistical-analysis-r-public-health

 

Udemy: Excel course – fee currently reduced at £12:99

https://www.udemy.com/course/ultimate-excel-programmer/?utm_medium=udemyads&moon=tethys&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=NEW-FB-TECH-EN-ENG-Instagram-creative&utm_term=_._ag_NEW-FB-TECH-ExcelProgrammer19--ENG_._ci_164058_OLD_tyalhT-Lookalike+_._ci_._._ad_6171703862670_._

 

Cobwebs: free LE webinars

https://www.cobwebs.com/events/webinars/

 

The National White Collar Crime Center – US based and Free!

https://www.nw3c.org/webinars

 

 

 

-Covid related articles:

The global pandemic gives criminologists and analysts the ideal opportunity to examine crime as a real life, real time experiment. Here are some of the results of that work as we attempt to understand the world around us:

 

Changes in police calls for service during the early months of the 2020 coronavirus pandemic by Dr Matt Ashby.

Matt is an excellent data analyst and is leading the way with early research into the impact of covid-19 in law enforcement: https://osf.io/preprints/socarxiv/h4mcu/

 

The Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science have a Covid-19 Special Papers section on their website. These papers are expected to grow over the next few weeks. It is a good opportunity to keep in touch with the latest research: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/jill-dando-institute/research/covid-19-special-papers

 

Policing Insight is a good source of up-to-date information on law enforcement issues in the UK. Currently there are a few features on Covid-19 / pandemic related stuff. It is free sign up for limited access: https://policinginsight.com/features/opinion/covid-19-has-reduced-knife-crime-but-gang-culture-can-only-be-tackled-through-societal-change/

... and https://policinginsight.com/features/analysis/opportunity-knocks-how-crime-patterns-can-change-during-a-pandemic/

 

Policing the Coronavirus Outbreak: Processes and Prospects for Collective Disorder https://academic.oup.com/policing/advance-article/doi/10.1093/police/paaa014/5812788

 

Visualising the COVID-19 outbreak with Infographics: Informationisbeautiful.net

 

LSE Blog on 'What makes Britons trust police to enforce the lockdown fairly?' blogs.LSE.ac.uk

LSE Blog on 'The lockdown and social norms: why the UK is complying by consent rather than compulsion'

 

Corona and crime - A risk analysis and ten preventive suggestions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ1U9Yej9ik